Chiropractic Has Major Positive Effect on Headache Pain

matteo#headache-10079250A study compared 53 subjects who had cervicogenic (neck related) headaches in accordance with the standards of the International Headache Society.

The group was split in two. Approximately half of the group received chiropractic manipulation; the other half received low-level laser and deep friction massage. The care was given in six sessions over three weeks.

Significant improvement occurred in both halves, especially in those receiving chiropractic treatment.

Those receiving chiropractic manipulation for their headaches:

– decreased their medication use by 36%

– decreased their headache hours by 69%

– decreased their headache intensity by 36%

The results of the study may not be good news to makers of over-the-counter pain medication, but is good news for those wanting to relieve headache pain without drugs; and by addressing the cause of the pain, rather than just treating symptoms.

Don’t forget, if you ever have any questions or concerns about your health, talk to us. Contact us with your questions. We’re here to help and don’t enjoy anything more than participating in providing you natural pain relief.
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SOURCE: Dr. Tom Scherer, The Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics 1997, as reported in Dynamic Chiropractic, October

Can Chiropractic help your headaches? Read before you suffer more..

matteo_pondering oatmealHeadaches (HA) can be tremendously disabling, forcing sufferers away from work or play into a dark, quiet room to minimize any noise and light that intensifies the pain. According to the National Headache Foundation, there are over 45 million Americans who suffer from chronic, re-occurring headaches, of which 28 million are of the migraine variety. Also, approximately 20% of children and adolescents deal with headaches that can interfere significantly with their daily routines. There are many different types of headaches and many sub-types within the main categories. Here are a few: Tension HA (also, called cervicogenic HA), migraine, mixed headache syndrome (a mixture of migraine and tension HAs), cluster (less common but the most severe), sinus headaches, acute headaches, hormone headaches, chronic progressive headaches (traction or inflammatory HAs), and MANY more! Just “GOOGLE” “headache classification” for the daunting list! Let’s take a look at how chiropractic manages these headaches!

According to a study completed in 2005, a review of the published literature revealed good evidence that intensity and frequency of HAs are indeed helped by chiropractic intervention. They limited their review to cervicogenic headaches and spinal manipulation and noted the need for larger scale studies. The well-respected Cochrane database reported spinal manipulation (SM) as an effective treatment option with short-term benefits similar to amitriptyline, a commonly prescribed medication for migraine HA patients.

For cervicogenic HA, the combination of neck exercises and SM was found to be effective in both the short- and long-term, and SM was superior to massage or placebo (sham or “fake” manipulation). Regarding the question of treatment frequency of SM plus up to two modalities (heat and soft tissue therapy), a preliminary study found that when comparing patients receiving one, three, or four visits per week for three weeks, those receiving 9-12 treatments during the three weeks had the most benefit. Regarding the questions, “what is affected by SM” and, “why does SM work” for cervicogenic HA patients, a study describes the intimate relationship between the upper cervical nerve roots (C1-3), the trigeminal (cranial nerve V), the spinal accessory (cranial nerve XI), and the vascular system. Inflammation within these structures and their relationship with the trapezius and SCM muscles help us understand the “why” and “how” of SM and referred pain pattern to the face and head in those with cervicogenic HAs. Realizing this is a bit “technical”, feel free to GOOGLE these structures and you’ll appreciate the close proximity they have to each other and how adjustments, or SM, applied to the upper cervical spine can affect this region. It has also been reported that SM and strengthening of the deep neck flexor muscles benefits the cervicogenic HA patient. Many HA sufferers have combinations of symptoms including dizziness, neck pain, concentration “fog”, fatigue, and others, which were found to also respond to SM applied to the upper cervical spine. One study reported a 36% reduction in pain killer medication use in a group of cervicogenic headache patients receiving SM but no reduction in the patient group receiving soft-tissue therapy. The list of research studies goes on and on! So WHAT are you waiting for? TRY CHIROPRACTIC for your headache management!!!

We realize you have a choice in whom you consider for your health care provision. If you, a friend, or family member requires care for headaches, we would be honored to render our services.

Don’t forget, if you ever have any questions or concerns about your health, talk to us. Contact us with your questions. We’re here to help and don’t enjoy anything more than participating in providing you natural pain relief.
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Health Alert: Maternal Use of Acetaminophen Increases Risk of Offspring Behavioral Disorders

ImageA Danish study suggests that children of mothers who used acetaminophen during their pregnancy are at greater risk of developing behavioral problems such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study involved about 64,000 children and their mothers and revealed that about 50% of mothers used acetaminophen during their pregnancy. Children of those mothers were more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD-like behaviors at age seven and more likely to use medications for the disorder. The authors of the study note that further research is needed to determine the association.
JAMA Pediatrics, February 2014